Our Team
Jeff Florick, CEO

Jeff@axisgroup.com | Phone: 123-456-7890

This is a great space to write long text about your company and your services. You can use this space to go into a little more detail about your company. Talk about your team and what services you provide. Tell your visitors the story of how you came up with the idea for your business and what makes you different from your competitors. Make your company stand out and show your visitors who you are.

 

This is a great space to write long text about your company and your services. You can use this space to go into a little more detail about your company. Talk about your team and what services you provide. Tell your visitors the story of how you came up with the idea for your business and what makes you different from your competitors. Make your company stand out and show your visitors who you are.

 

This is a great space to write long text about your company and your services. You can use this space to go into a little more detail about your company. Talk about your team and what services you provide. Tell your visitors the story of how you came up with the idea for your business and what makes you different from your competitors. Make your company stand out and show your visitors who you are.

 

This is a great space to write long text about your company and your services. You can use this space to go into a little more detail about your company. Talk about your team and what services you provide. Tell your visitors the story of how you came up with the idea for your business and what makes you different from your competitors. Make your company stand out and show your visitors who you are.

 

Jenny Van Bingen, CFO

Jenny@axisgroup.com | Phone: 123-456-7890

Nora Lee Smith, HR

Noralee@axisgroup.com | Phone: 123-456-7890

Denis G. Roberts, Sales Manager

Denis@axisgroup.com | Phone: 123-456-7890

¿Que es Enterprise Content Management - ECM ?

 

Enterprise Content Management (ECM) is the strategies, methods and tools used to capture, manage, store, preserve, and deliver content and documents related to organizational processes. (fuente AIIM)

It’s not enough to “manage” content. The ability to access the correct version of a document or record is important. Content must be managed so that it is used to achieve business goals.

Enterprise Content Management is the systematic collection and organization of information that is to be used by a designated audience – business executives, customers, etc. Neither a single technology nor a methodology nor a process, it is a dynamic combination of strategies, methods, and tools used to capture, manage, store, preserve, and deliver information supporting key organizational processes through its entire lifecycle.
 

  • Capture boils down to entering content into the system.

  • Manage is what you do next to it, so it can be found and used by whomever it is intended for.

  • Storing it means finding it an appropriate home in your infrastructure, be it a formal content management system or other information solution.

  • Preserve refers to long-term care – archiving, if you will – the practice of protecting it so it can be utilized however far into the future the organization needs it to be available.

  • And deliver is all about putting the information in the right people’s hands right when they need it to be there.


Document management eventually was subsumed into content management in no small measure because there is more information available to us today than ever before, and most of it is not being created by us.  Thanks to the mainstreaming of a whole range of sources like the Web, thumb drives, smartphones, cloud, etc., the need has accelerated to deal with information of all kinds: not just in terms of more media types like text vs. images vs. voice files, but also in terms of how structured – and thus how readily managed – it all is.

Structured information is information that is highly defined and not only is intended to be processed by a computer program, but readily can be – like most of the information held in relational databases and acted upon by line-of-business solutions.

Unstructured information is, well, information that does not have a fully defined structure, and most likely will be read and used by humans. As examples, think of most of the information produced by common office applications (word processors, presentation programs).

Semi-structured information is information that lies somewhere in between, like invoices, purchase orders, and receipts, which contain data to be computer-processed but which come in formats and layouts that first need to be identified and classified – a task that often is handled by humans but increasingly is being automated as the tools improve. 
This all becomes important when you consider the effect on your business that not managing these elements can have! Diminished utility, loss of time, loss of productivity, possible non-compliance with regulations or corporate policies, the risk of serious business interruption if key repositories die or natural disasters strike – none of them happy outcomes!

Effectiveness, efficiency, compliance, and continuity all combine, in different proportions, to drive the business case for content management in most organizations.

Transactional content management targets processes that focus on enacting business or bringing about a decision or end-result. These processes are not focused on creating content, but using content to help drive actions and decisions.

Examples include invoice processing, application processing, employee onboarding, accounts payable, insurance claims, patient charts, and the processing of permits and loans.

We talk about transactional content management here rather than under content management because it usually requires a lot of workflow configuration and integration with other systems. Being content-oriented, though, it just as easily could have been listed under content management as the name suggests. For charting purposes, think of it as occupying a space right along the border between the process and content disciplines – which are fairly tightly tied together anyway.

ECM is an ongoing and evolving strategy for maximizing how your content is to be used.

Las Soluciones de Arkiva te ayudan a mejorar en forma integral contemplado una parte o todo el mapa de ECM.

 

MAPA DE AIIM Modificado para Arkiva (haciendo referencia para no viloar ningun derecho de autor)

ACERCA DE ARKIVA

Need more details? Contact us

We are here to assist. Contact us by phone, email or via our Social Media channels.

 

What is Document Management (DMS)?

 

 

Document management, often referred to as Document Management Systems (DMS), is the use of a computer system and software to store, manage and track electronic documents and electronic images of paper based information captured through the use of a document scanner. 

Document management is how your organization stores, manages and tracks its electronic documents.

According to ISO 12651-2, a document is "recorded information or object which can be treated as a unit". While this sounds a little complicated, it is quite simply what you have been using to create, distribute and use for years.

Now, we can define document management as the software that controls and organizes documents throughout an organization. It incorporates document and content capture, workflow, document repositories, COLD/ERM, and output systems, and information retrieval systems.  Also, the processes used to track, store and control documents.

Document management is one of the precursor technologies to content management, and not all that long ago was available solely on a stand-alone basis like its imaging, workflow, and archiving brethren. It provides some of the most basic functionality to content management, imposing controls and management capabilities onto otherwise “dumb” documents. This makes it so that when you have documents and need to use them, you are able to do so. Some of the key features in document management include:

  • Check-in/check-out and locking, to coordinate the simultaneous editing of a document so one person’s changes don’t overwrite another’s

  • Version control, so tabs can be kept on how the current document came to be, and how it differs from the versions that came before

  • Roll-back, to “activate” a prior version in case of an error or premature release

  • Audit trail, to permit the reconstruction of who did what to a document during the course of its life in the system

  • Annotation and Stamps,

Document management eventually was subsumed into content management in no small measure because there is more information available to us today than ever before, and most of it is not being created by us.  Thanks to the mainstreaming of a whole range of sources like the Web, thumb drives, smartphones, etc., the need has accelerated to deal with information of all kinds: not just in terms of more media types like text vs. images vs. voice files, but also in terms of how structured – and thus how readily managed – it all is.

Document management systems today range in size and scope from small, standalone systems to large scale enterprise-wide configurations serving a global audience.  Many document management systems provide a means to incorporate standard physical document filing practices electronically. These include:

  • Storage location

  • Security and access control

  • Version control

  • Audit trails

  • Check-in/check-out and document lockdown.

 

 

Document management, while still recognized and utilized independently, it is also a common component found within an Enterprise Content Management environment.
 

© 2016 por Arkiva

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